Wednesday, 2 January 2008

Australian Blue Tongue Lizard - Wordless Wednesday

Wordless Wednesday
australian blue tongue lizard (blue tongue skink) - Tiliqua rugosa - Shingleback Skink - Tiliqua mustifaciata - Central Blue-Tongued Skink. basking in the sun scales skin close up photo of blue tongue lizard (or blue tounge lizard) from Queensland, AustraliaAustralian Blue Tongue Lizard (Tiliqua mustifaciata) basking in the Sun

This photo taken with the Fujifilm S9600 digital camera.
Shutter speed: 1/209, F4.6, ISO 100

28 comments:

  1. David, What a sweet picture! When I was in Australia, I saw a blue tounge one near Coff's Harbor, and it was a very cool sight. Are these common where you live?
    Tom

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  2. Hi davidlind,

    Yep, the eyes certainly are cool. I chose to crop this picture close in to emphasize them.

    Cheers,

    David

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  3. Hi Tom,

    These lizards used to be common in back yards here a few years ago, but the lack of water during the drought must have driven most of them away. Now they are most commonly found in the national parks, where I got this photo.

    Cheers,

    David

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  4. Great shot. Looks like he is waiting to see what you are going to do next.

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  5. When I pulled up my Google Reader today... this is what greeted me!! I nearly jumped off my seat! :)

    Great closeup... he's not cute though...

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  6. Hi anonymous,

    He certainly is watching to see what you'll do - but whatever it is, he won't move. I tried for ages to get this fella to react, but he wouldn't budge!

    Cheers,

    David

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  7. Hi angie,

    He's very threatening looking, isn't he? Trust me, you don't want to get bitten by one of these - they hurt!

    Cheers,

    David

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  8. Awesome shot - even though I'm not too fond of these fellows ;)

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  9. Wow, this is just stunning. The perfection!
    The visual story of 'Wordless Wednesday' needs no comments - your photo talks out of itself.
    Wow, I have started the conversation with these silent eyes! That's so literally.
    Congratulation!

    Every single spot of your blog catches my eye and captures. Wow and wow, and wow!!!
    Thank you once more again - I am sorry just for my own weak English for to put my deep emotions into the words
    You are the Master I'm proud of welcoming - ACIU!!!

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  10. David, wow what a lizard, and you have those around, how big is this creature, and can you have as pet. We don't have lizards here, otherwise, they would freeze, just pets. Great shot. Anna :)

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  11. Hi nicole,

    Sounds like you've had some experience with these fellows!

    Cheers,

    David

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  12. Hi tomas,

    Thanks a lot for your comment. I really appreciate your compliments, and it's great to know that someone has benefited from my photography. I hope your blogs go well this year too!

    Cheers,

    David

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  13. Hi Anna,

    I'm not sure that anyone has these as pets here. I suppose they are too common! Here are some details on the two species which are common around here:

    T. mustifaciata - Central Blue-Tongued Skink: Can be found in both desert and tropical environments in North Territory, Queensland, South Australia and West Australia. They will grow to 15 to 18 inches in length and will feed on wild flowers, small animals and insects.

    T. rugosa - <Shingleback Skink: Generally found in New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Victoria and West Australia. They can reach sizes of up to 15 inches in length. They get their name from their large keeled scales. They are generally brown-black in color with lighter bands across the back. Recent research also suggests that this species is monogamous.

    Cheers,

    David

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  14. For more info on the different species of Blue Tongue, check out this link.

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  15. Thanks for the Input on the RSS - now, I found your RSS, but do you have a comment feed as well?
    :)

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  16. Yep, I do have a comment feed for each post: look underneath the "Post a Comment" link, or click here for this post's comment feed.

    I haven't got around to burning it yet though! :)

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  17. Beautiful shot...scares me. :D

    Hugs, JJ

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  18. Hi JJ,

    They are scary creatures, especially when seen up close, but leave them alone and they won't hurt you.

    Cheers,

    David

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  19. Hi digital flower pictures,

    Thanks, and have a happy new year too. Hope you had a nice Christmas, and continue to enjoy the Christmas spirit!

    Cheers,

    David

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  20. Wow such a great capture. I love the way you capture the lizard with powerful eye.

    Cheers,
    DSM

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  21. Hi digitalshuttermania,

    His eye certainly is the most powerful part of this picture! The wonders of nature..... :)

    Cheers,

    David

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  22. Hi David again, thanks for the information, very useful. Any of those wouldn't survive in Canada, just in climate adjusted environments like zoos or pet stores, and than homes. Seems like many people do own lizards at home, I guess they are easy to maintain, and cool to watch and have them as pets, and me I just like them in someone else's places, lol. Never really like seeing pets in captivity, I really think they belong in open, as long they are not in danger. As a matter fact it is illegal in many places to have wild animal as pet here in Canada. Thanks for letting me know again, Anna :)

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  23. Hi Anna,

    I don't really like seeing pets in captivity either, it's much nicer to see them in their natural habitat and nice for them too. :)

    Cheers,

    David

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